#Great Place North Belfast

Great Place North Belfast is a project of the North Belfast Heritage Cluster. It uses the unique built heritage and authentic character to deliver and support regeneration in this part of north Belfast. Working with fifteen heritage organisations the project features their historic buildings and sites stretching for one mile along Donegall Street, Clifton Street, the Crumlin Road and part of the Antrim Road.

North Belfast Heritage Cluster Members

The North Belfast Heritage Cluster aims to deliver heritage led regeneration through making use of the area’s authentic character to support economic and social development.

Belfast Cathedral

Donegal Street

Redeemer Central / Donegall Street Congregational Church

Donegal Street

St Patrick’s Church & Parochial House

Donegal Street

Frederick Street Quaker Meeting House

Frederick Street

Belfast Charitable Society - Clifton House

Clifton Street

Belfast Charitable Society: Clifton Street Cemetery

Clifton Street

Recent Projects

Loss, Hope and Humility: Forster Green

We begin this theme focusing on Medical History by looking at a man whose name may be familiar to many of you. Forster Green was a local tea merchant who, motivated by personal loss, donated generously to help ease the suffering of others. Many may recognise him from the hospital that still bears his name […]

Fire and Sandstone: William Henry Lynn

Throughout this topic we have discussed the rivalry between Barre and Lanyon, the industrial specialist that was William Gilliland and the influential Thomas Jackson. Now, as we bring this research to a close, we turn to an architect who may be familiar to you due to events that occurred in the summer of 2018: William […]

Clocks, Towers and Titans: A Rivalry in Stone

The North Belfast Heritage Cluster is made up of some of the most storied and architecturally significant buildings from Georgian and Victorian Ireland. These historic buildings, along with others across Belfast were designed by some of the foremost minds of their day, with architects such as Thomas Jackson, and William Henry Lynn. They laid the […]

A Photographer for Royalty: John Phillips

Over the summer of 2023, members of Clifton Street Orange Hall were hard at work sorting through a room on the top floor of the building. ‘Room 7’ as it is known, had been a storage room that had accumulated all sorts of historic artefacts, from Lodge Bibles and Minute books to old portraits and […]

The Industry Standard- William John Gilliland

The most prolific architects of the Victorian era often were the most sought-after mentors. Being apprenticed to one of these architects afforded you connections with some of the best names in the business. For the young apprentices it was an opportunity to learn from the most skilled individuals in the trade, whilst for the architects […]

The Mind behind St Malachy’s- Thomas Jackson

As part of our continued research into the buildings that make up the North Belfast Heritage Cluster, we are looking at an architect who, not only designed many of the buildings of Belfast, but also played an important role within some of the cluster members. Thomas Jackson was a very flexible architect, capable of designing […]

“A Heroine on the Home Front”-Blanche Hume OBE

Welcome to the fourth and final part of our November Remembrance series 2023. For this story, we return to Belfast to highlight the efforts of civilians on the Home Front and in particular a pioneering woman in Belfast’s rich history. In this piece we look at Blanche Hume; someone who overcame personal tragedy to become […]

Redeemer Central Seed Fund: Portraits and Pictures

In March 2023 we posted about the history of Donegal Congregational Church. Whilst much of this work was completed using British newspaper archives and academic sources, the research was aided in the discovery of several old drawings of the site, depicting the church in its various stages. These drawings proved a great asset in our […]

St Patrick’s Church Seed Fund: The Braniff Tiles

Discovered in the bottom of a chicken coop by Father O’Niell, these tiles are the work of local artist Daniel Ignatius Braniff. DI Braniff was a stained glass artist, and examples of his work exist in St Patrick’s, St Stephen’s, Millfield and Belfast City Hall. Whilst incomplete, they are a great example of the work […]

We’re Hiring – Re-Creating a Great Place North Belfast

Subject to funding approval, we have two fantastic job opportunities available to work with us on the heritage regeneration project ‘Great Place North Belfast.’ Both post holders will work alongside the members of North Belfast Heritage Cluster and partner organisations for the duration of the four and a half year project. To apply, see relevant […]

“North Belfast Families- Their Stories”: The Condell Brothers

Last week, we looked at the Dornan family from Agnes Street. Their names appeared in the roll and register books for the Loyal Orange Lodge 1890. This lodge was originally chosen for research as there was a corresponding Roll of Honour displayed on the wall inside Belfast Orange Hall, remembering members who fought during the […]

“North Belfast Families-Their Stories”: The Dornans of Agnes Street.

As part of the Great Place North Belfast project the archive co-ordinator has been conducting genealogical research using archival material from members of the North Belfast Heritage Cluster. During the transcription of a roll and register, one family in particular stood out. This was the Dornan brothers, Samuel, William and George, who lived at 114 […]

The Marsh Brothers: Biscuit and Tin manufacturers.

Industrial heritage has often been focused on mechanical advancements, many of which acted as important cogs in British industry, and revolutionised how objects were made. Whilst the focus on machines of the industrial revolution is important, it often comes at the expense of the men, and women, behind the machines. Even when history focuses on […]

Messers Marsh & Co. Donegall Street Biscuit Makers.

North Belfast was once a place of proud industrial heritage however its history and identity has been eroded and erased through years of conflict and urban decay. The rubble strewn site at 140 Donegall Street is representative of this. Once an area of affluence, industry and worship, Donegall Street’s downturn in fortunes is symbolised by […]